Facebook
Google+
http://kaplanskorner.com/category/my-hank-greenberg-book/page/2">
Twitter

Archive for the ‘My Hank Greenberg book’ Category

 

Shameless self-promotion once again

Posted on: April 28th, 2017 by Ron Kaplan

Sorry, but you have to strike while the iron is hot…

I’m not much for self-promotion, but the older I get, the less I care what people think of me.

That said, if anyone is looking for a guest on their baseball, Jewish, or Jewish sports-related show/podcast/article/etc., in the words of one of the lesser-known Beatles songs, “You Know My Name (Look up The Number).” One of the unfortunate aspects of the story is that some of the problems that plagued the U.S. and the world in 1938 have returned. So maybe I shouldn’t be smiling here.

We have lift-off! ‘Hank Greenberg’ launches today

Posted on: April 25th, 2017 by Ron Kaplan

Shameless self-promotion alert: Happy to announce that Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War officially launched at midnight.

There’s a separate page on this blog for news about the book. I’ll be posting links to events, interviews, and reviews (both favorable and un-; already received one of the latter from someone who was disappointed that a) it wasn’t a full biography although I think that should be pretty much obvious from the title; and b) there weren’t enough pages).

A reminder: I will be at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse next Wednesday, May 3, at 7 p.m. Click here for more details and to RSVP.

Bergino Baseball Clubhouse

Let the interviews begin (shameless-self promotion)

Posted on: April 19th, 2017 by Ron Kaplan

Had a couple this morning about the Greenberg book, one with WKNY in Kingston, NY, and this, from WKLB-FM in Lafayette, Louisiana.

I wonder what the Jewish population is down there?

Save

Be there or be square: My gig at the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse

Posted on: April 17th, 2017 by Ron Kaplan

Pleased to be making a second trip to the Bergino Baseball Clubhouse in Manhattan.

I’ll be there on Wednesday, May 3, at 7.p.m., to discuss Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, with Bergino proprietor and friend to authors Jay Goldberg.

I’d love to see you there. Please visit here to RSVP for guaranteed seating in this intimate setting.

http://www.ronkaplansbaseballbookshelf.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/B2.jpg

 

Save

Perfect timing for a little SSP (Hank Greenberg project)

Posted on: January 2nd, 2017 by Ron Kaplan

(As in “shameless self-promotion.”) Actually yesterday would have been the perfect time as it would have been Hank Greenberg‘s 106th birthday. Considering that Tyrus Wong, illustrator for the classic Walt Disney flick Bambi, recently died at that age, it’s not outside the realm of possibility that Hammerin’ Hank could still be with us.

As you may know, my new book, Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War, is due out on April 4. As the title states, it focuses on that one season during which Greenberg was within a few long foul balls from wresting the single season home run record of 60 away from Babe Ruth. Ruth had set the mark in 1927, but there was no pressure, no competition: if he broke his former record, well and good. If not, no big deal. He was enjoying a fun ride.

But as Ruth grew into a fat old man, a new generation of sluggers — Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Rudy York, and Greenberg — were poised to usurp his place in the record books, although no one could replace him as a legendary character and the man who many credit with “saving” the game following the 1919 Black Sox scandal. Those guys felt the pressure, especially from journalists hungry for sensational story lines. And as the season wore on and time was running out, that pressure built even more.

Of course, baseball was just a minor matter compared with what was going on in Europe. Hitler was creating bigger headlines every day as he stepped up his goal of world domination. The book compares and contrasts, using Greenberg and Judaism as the focal points (not all the anti-Semites were in Germany).

Hank Greenberg in 1938 is entering the home stretch now, having gone through a couple of rounds of edits before the proofreading, followed by the bound galleys or ‘arcs’ (advanced reader copies) which will be sent to reviewers in advance of the release date.

With a couple of books in the bank, I know enough to both enjoy the bustle and excitement of the weeks ahead as well as not having grand expectations that this will wind up on the New York Times‘ best-seller list. (No false modesty, just keepin’ it real.) Anyway, it keeps me busy and from being too depressed about not having a full-time job yet.

 

Save

When Hank ‘met’ Jackie

Posted on: December 7th, 2016 by Ron Kaplan

I just finished the first round of edits on the manuscript for my forthcoming book, Hank Greenberg in 1938: Hatred and Home Runs in the Shadow of War (scheduled for release April 4, 2017. Just sayin’.)

The last chapter deals with Greenberg’s final playing season as a member of the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1947. There’s a famous incident in which he had occasion to converse with Jackie Robinson, who broke baseball’s color line that year. The two of the collided at first base in a May 15 game. Greenberg helped Robinson to his feet and gave him some words of encouragement, for which the Brooklyn rookie was most grateful.

“Class tells. It sticks out all over Mr. Greenberg,” Robinson told the pres after the game.

That made me think of this:

In the movie 42, about Robinson’s first season, the first black player was hit in the head by a pitch from Fritz Ostermueller. That game took place on May 17 against the Pirates in Pittsburgh.

Well, Greenberg was in the lineup for the Pirates that day. In fact, he hit a two-run homer to give his team the only runs they would need in a 4-0 win over Brooklyn. The Pirates had only four hits and Greenberg had two of them.

Too bad they didn’t include the Robinson-Greenberg conversation in the movie.

http://www.yourfavoriteteamsets.com/ItemImages/000019/19457a_med.jpeg

 

Save

On this date in Hank Greenberg’s 1938 season…

Posted on: July 15th, 2016 by Ron Kaplan

As you may know, I am working on a book about Hammerin’ Hank for the year in which he challenged what was then the biggest number in sports: Babe Ruth’s single season record of 60 home runs.

So as I do the research for the project, I thought I’d be a nice guy and share some of it with you. Helps me, helps you. Win-win.

So on Thursday, July 15, 1938…

Greenberg was 0-2 in a six-inning, rain shortened, 3-0 loss to the host NY Yankees.

One wonder what Greenberg might have done if he had not lost at bats in several games over the course of the season. He was batting fifth in the order on July 15 and would have been the second batter in the seventh. Who knows if he might have had another chance after that.

There were eight games that were curtailed, either because of weather or darkness (especially in doubleheader nightcaps late in the season). He also came out of one game in the seventh because of a minor injury and there was one  that ended in a tie.

His plate appearances in each of the shortened game (at bats plus walks or other means of getting on base with a charged time at bat):

  • May 15, 5 inning, 3 PA
  • May 28, 6 innings, 4 PA
  • July 15, 6 innings 2 PA
  • September 2 (second game), 6 innings, 4 PA
  • September 21 (second game), 5 innings, 3 PA
  • September 23 (second game), 7 innings, 4 PA
  • September 27 (second game), 7 innings, 4 PA
  • October 2 (second game, season finale), 7 innings, 4 PA

Greenberg average 4.4 plate appearances per game, so he was definitely shortchanged along the way. Of course, you could point to the 10 extra-inning games and say, “Well, didn’t Greenberg benefit from extra at bats in those?”

  • May 3, 10 inning, 5 PA
  • May 8, 10 innings, 5 PA
  • June 10, 10 innings 5 PA
  • July 3, 10 innings 4 PA
  • July 8, 11 innings, 5 PA
  • July 19, 10 innings, 5 PA
  • August 3, 11 innings 6 PA
  • August 5, 10 innings, 5 PA
  • August 28, 10 innings, 4 PA
  • September 4, 10 innings, 4 PA

So the short answer would seem to be yes. But there are probably other factors in play which I’m too time-bound to look into at the moment. Bit I will be as I get further into the project.

 

 

On this date in Hank Greenberg’s 1938 season…

Posted on: July 14th, 2016 by Ron Kaplan

As you may know, I am working on a book about Hammerin’ Hank for the year in which he challenged what was then the biggest number in sports: Babe Ruth’s single season record of 60 home runs.

So as I do the research for the project, I thought I’d be a nice guy and share some of it with you. Helps me, helps you. Win-win.

So on Thursday, July 14, 

Greenberg was 0-4, striking out once, in the Tigers’ 12-1 rubbing by the visiting Boston Red Sox.

Jimmie Foxx, Greenberg’s primary rival for the home run crown, smacked his 24 of the season (Hank had 26 by that point), a three run shot in the second that was part of a six-score inning. Foxx also singled twice and walked.

This date in Hank Greenberg’s 1938 season

Posted on: May 12th, 2016 by Ron Kaplan
Corsicana_Daily_Sun_Thu__May_12__1938_

From the Corsicana Daily Sun, May 12, 1938

As you may know, I am working on a book about Hammerin’ Hank for the year in which he challenged what was then the biggest number in sports: Babe Ruth’s single season record of 60 home runs.

So as I do the research for the project, I thought I’d be a nice guy and share some of it with you. Helps me, helps you. Win-win.

So on Thursday, May 12, 1938…

Greenberg hit his seventh home run of the year, a three-run shot that brought the Detroit Tigers to within one run of the host Washington Senators. But that’s as close as they got, losing 7-6 before 7,000 at Griffith Stadium.

Greenberg made two errors, one of which went against the mark of reliever Harry Eisenstat, who allowed one unearned run in two innings of work, striking out one and giving up a hit. And that brought his ERA down to an ugly 12.46.

The loss dropped the Tigers to 8-12 and a fifth place berth in the eight-team league.

This date in Hank Greenberg’s 1938 season

Posted on: May 11th, 2016 by Ron Kaplan

As you may know, I am working on a book about Hammerin’ Hank for the year in which he challenged what was then the biggest number in sports: Babe Ruth’s single season record of 60 home runs.

So as I do the research for the project, I thought I’d be a nice guy and share some of it with you. Helps me, helps you. Win-win.

So on Wednesday, May 11, 1938…

The Tigers scored all their runs in the second inning to beat the host Washington Senators, 4-1, displacing the team from our nation’s capital from first place.

Greenberg drove in his ninth run with his fifth two-base hit, his only safety in three official at bats; he also walked twice.

Vern Kennedy scattered four walks and seven hits for his fourth victory without a defeat. He was aided by three double plays and even helped his own cause with a run-scoring single for his fourth RBI of the year putting him just five behind the every day-playing Greenberg. Maybe Hank needed even more Wheaties…

 

WheatiesAdDFP

   
 

©2018 Kaplan's Korner | Designed by Access Computer Technology